The Africa Center Newsroom

For many years, Maasai pastoralists had resisted government pressure to reduce the size of their herds.  However, the loss of more than half their livestock in the 2009 drought has led Maasai pastoralists in northern Tanzania’s Arusha region to breed fewer, stronger cattle and end their traditional focus on numbers alone as symbols of wealth and status.
 

The Africa Center members, Robin Reid and Kathleen Galvin, have recently received the 2012 Ecological Society of America Sustainability Science Award for their collaborative paper, “Evolution of models to support community and policy action with science: Balancing pastoral livelihoods and wildlife conservation in savannas of East Africa.”  The paper is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Congratulations Robin and Kathy!

Kathleen Galvin, who is a CSU professor of anthropology, senior research scientist at the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, and Director for Education programs at the CSU School of Global Environmental Sustainability, has been invited by the president of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to sit on a new Global Climate Change Task Force. The task force has been developed to help increase communication, provide a forum for engagement and highlight anthropological contributions to climate change policy. 

Two Colorado State University researchers are launching a research project that will ultimately help Maasai livestock herders in Kenya adapt to impacts from climate change.

 

Pages